For anyone who thinks 3D printing is simply a way for hobby enthusiasts to while away hours, it’s time to look at the impact this technology has had in the medical field. So far, 3D printing has been used to build medical instruments, craft prosthetics, construct realistic surgical models and even print tiny dissolvable splints that could be inserted in a child’s weakened airway. But its biggest accomplishments may lie ahead. As medical professionals continue to use the technology to help patients and save lives, the end goal remains the ability to 3D-create a human organ, which can be transplanted into a patient with lasting results. The embrace of 3D technology by the medical industry has not gone unnoticed. In 2016, CBS debuted a weekly serial, Pure Genius, that regularly showcases a variety of 3D printing applications in healthcare.

For anyone who thinks 3D printing is simply a way for hobby enthusiasts to while away hours, it’s time to look at the impact this technology has had in the medical field. So far, 3D printing has been used to build medical instruments, craft prosthetics, construct realistic surgical models and even print tiny dissolvable splints that could be inserted in a child’s weakened airway. But its biggest accomplishments may lie ahead. As medical professionals continue to use the technology to help patients and save lives, the end goal remains the ability to 3D-create a human organ, which can be transplanted into a patient with lasting results. The embrace of 3D technology by the medical industry has not gone unnoticed. In 2016, CBS debuted a weekly serial, Pure Genius, that regularly showcases a variety of 3D printing applications in healthcare.