It’s not surprising that the U.S, military and defense contractors were among the first to seize on the untapped potential of 3D printing. Less than five years later, the technology is being utilized to print parts and tools for sophisticated military equipment, such as the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, a next-generation fighter jet. The technology also is being used to design and build drones, 3D-printed firearms and more. Already in 2017, we’ve seen the debut of RAMBO, which stands for Rapid Additively Manufactured Ballistics Ordnance, which is the U.S. Army’s 3D-printed grenade launcher with 3D-printed grenades. That took just six months to design and create. And this is just one example that’s been publicly announced. Imagine what else the government is working on that it won’t tell us about!

It’s not surprising that the U.S, military and defense contractors were among the first to seize on the untapped potential of 3D printing. Less than five years later, the technology is being utilized to print parts and tools for sophisticated military equipment, such as the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, a next-generation fighter jet. The technology also is being used to design and build drones, 3D-printed firearms and more. Already in 2017, we’ve seen the debut of RAMBO, which stands for Rapid Additively Manufactured Ballistics Ordnance, which is the U.S. Army’s 3D-printed grenade launcher with 3D-printed grenades. That took just six months to design and create. And this is just one example that’s been publicly announced. Imagine what else the government is working on that it won’t tell us about!